Section 2: Employment

This section presents statistics on employment and full-time, year-round employment. For both categories of employment, data are presented concerning those with disabilities, those without disabilities, and the employment gap (difference in employment rate) between these two populations. The principal source of these data is the U.S. Census Bureau, specifically the American Community Survey.



Table 2.1: Civilians with Disabilities Ages 18-64 Years Living in the Community for the U.S.
Table 2.2: Civilians without Disabilities Ages 18-64 Years Living in the Community for the U.S.
In 2012, of the 20,007,119 individuals with disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community, 6,551,987 individuals were employed—an employment rate of 32.7 percent. In contrast, of the 175,690,083 individuals without disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community, 129,274,939 individuals were employed—an employment rate of 73.6 percent. The employment rate for people with disabilities was highest in South Dakota (52.0 percent) and lowest in the West Virginia (24.3 percent).


Table 2.3: Civilians with Hearing Disabilities Ages 18-64 Living in the Community for the U.S.
In 2012, of the 4,022,334 individuals with hearing disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community, 1,975,853 individuals were employed—an employment rate of 49.1 percent. The employment rate for people with hearing disabilities was highest in South Dakota (70.8 percent) and lowest in West Virginia (32.7 percent).


Table 2.4: Civilians with Vision Disabilities Ages 18-64 Living in the Community for the U.S.
In 2012, of the 3,532,888 individuals with vision disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community, 1,289,897 individuals were employed—an employment rate of 36.5 percent. The employment rate for people with vision disabilities was highest in South Dakota (62.2 percent) and lowest in the West Virginia (23.8 percent).


Table 2.5: Civilians with Cognitive Disabilities Ages 18-64 Years Living in the Community for the U.S.
In 2012, of the 8,458,332 individuals with cognitive disabilities ages18 to 64 years living in the community, 1,924,807 individuals were employed—an employment rate of 22.8 percent. The employment rate for people with cognitive disabilities was highest in South Dakota (44.3 percent) and lowest in the West Virginia (14.4 percent).


Table 2.6: Civilians with Ambulatory Disabilities 18-64 Living in the Community for the U.S.
In 2012, of the 10,211,188 individuals with ambulatory disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community, 2,424,480 individuals were employed— an employment rate of 23.7 percent. The employment rate for people with ambulatory disabilities was highest in North Dakota (42.1 percent) and lowest in West Virginia (17.3 percent).


Table 2.7: Civilians with Self-Care Disabilities Ages 18-64 Years Living in the Community for the U.S.
In 2012, of the 3,666,174 individuals with self-care disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community, 585,349 individuals were employed—an employment rate of 16.0 percent. The employment rate for people with ambulatory disabilities was highest in South Dakota (26.5 percent) and lowest in Rhode Island (7.6 percent).


Table 2.8: Civilians with Independent Living Disabilities Ages 18-64 Years Living in the Community for the U.S.
In 2012, of the 7,142,749 individuals with independent living disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community, 1,102,254 individuals were employed—an employment rate of 15.4 percent. The employment rate for people with independent living disabilities was highest in Minnesota (27.7 percent) and lowest in Mississippi (10.1 percent).


Table 2.9: Employment Gap - Civilians Ages 18-64 Years Living in the Community for the U.S.
In 2012, the employment rate for individuals with disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community was 32.7 percent, while the employment rate for individuals without disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community was 73.6 percent—an employment gap of 40.8 percentage points. The employment gap was greatest in Rhode Island (48.3 percentage points) and smallest in South Dakota (29.8 percentage points).


Table 2.10: Change in Employment Gap - Civilians Ages 18-64 Years Living in the Community for the U.S.
In 2012, the employment gap between individuals with and without disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community was 40.8 percent, while the comparable measure was 40.2 in 2011.


Table 2.11: Full-Time, Year-Round - Civilians with Disabilities Ages 18-64 Years Living in the Community for the U.S.
Table 2.12: Full-Time, Year-Round - Civilians without Disabilities Ages 18-64 Years Living in the Community for the U.S.
In 2012, of the 21,375,660 individuals with disabilities ages Annual Disability Statistics Compendium: 2013 | Disability Statistics & Demographics 27 16 to 64 years living in the community, 4,051,610 individuals were employed full-time, year-round—a full-time, year-round employment rate of 19.0 percent. In contrast, of the 186,427,887 individuals without disabilities ages 16 to 64 years living in the community, 93,298,740 individuals were employed full-time, year-round—a full-time, year-round employment rate of 50.0 percent. The full-time, year-round employment rate for people with disabilities was highest in North Dakota (31.1 percent) and lowest in West Virginia (14.3 percent).


Table 2.13: Full-Time, Year-Round Gap - Civilians Ages 18-64 Years Living in the Community for the U.S.
In 2012, the full-time, year-round employment rate for individuals with disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community was 19.0 percent, while the full-time, year-round employment rate for individuals without disabilities ages 18 to 64 years living in the community was 50.0 percent—a full-time, year-round employment gap of 31.1 percentage points. The full-time, year-round employment gap was greatest in the District of Columbia (36.3 percentage points) and smallest in Alaska (25.4 percentage points).

 


2012 Disability Compendium

Funding for this project
is made possible by:

The Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics (StatsRRTC), which is funded by the U.S. Department of Education, National Institute for Disability and Rehabilitation Research, under cooperative agreements H133B080012.

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