County Report for Disability Prevalence

Acknowledgement

Special thanks to the following individuals who have contributed to the success of this effort: Deb Brucker, Erin Dame, Adam Lavoie, Rachel Coleman, Kate Filanoski, and Karen Volle. 

Funding for this publication is made possible by:

The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics (StatsRRTC), funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Community Living National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), grant number 90RT5022-02-01; and the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Employment Policy and Measurement (EPM-RRTC), also funded by NIDILRR, grant number 90RT5037-01-00. The information developed by the StatsRRTC and EPM-RRTC does not necessarily represent the policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government (Edgar, 75.620 (b)).

The StatsRRTC and EPM-RRTC are part of the Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire. The Institute on Disability/UCED (IOD) was established in 1987 to provide a university-based focus for the improvement of knowledge, policies, and practices related to the lives of people with disabilities and their families and is New Hampshire’s University Center for Excellence in Disability (UCED). Located within the University of New Hampshire, the IOD is a federally designated center authorized by the Developmental Disabilities Act. Through innovative and interdisciplinary research, academic, service, and dissemination initiatives, the IOD builds local, state, and national capacities to respond to the needs of individuals with disabilities and their families.

 

 

 
 
 
 

Institute on Disability / UCED
10 West Edge Drive, Suite 101
Durham, NH 03284
603.862.4320 | relay: 711 | contact.iod@unh.edu
www.iod.unh.edu

2015 North Dakota Report for County-level Data: Prevalence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on
Disability Statistics and Demographics
A NIDILRR-Funded Center

   NIDILIRR.jpg

 

Introduction

The State Reports for County-Level Data on Prevalence are designed to provide the users of disability statistics with the number of people with disabilities for any given state and county in the United States (U.S.). This report is intended to be an online compliment to Section 1: Population and Prevalence of the Annual Disability Statistics Compendium and Annual Disability Statistics Supplement, providing greater detail within each state. The State Reports for County-Level Data on Prevalence can be used to compare county-level statistics between counties in any given state or states. The following report provides county-level statistics for North Dakota.

The proportions of people with disabilities, sometimes called prevalence, presented in the State Reports for County-Level Data is a useful tool for advocates, researchers, and policy-makers to plan and provide services and supports for people with disabilities. In this report, the prevalence of people with disabilities is presented as the number of people with disabilities in a given state and county per total state and county populations, respectively. Counts and percentages are provided in tables and maps.

The data for this report comes from the American Community Survey 5-year data. The American Community Survey (ACS) is a national survey developed by the U.S. Census Bureau to provide information on a number of topics about social, economic, and demographic characteristics of the U.S. population. ACS 5-year data is collected over a longer period of time than 1-year data, providing larger sample sizes and increased reliability for less populated areas and small population subgroups. All of the statistics in this report use the ACS 5-year data which includes data from 2015, the year of the report, and data from the four previous years.

In the ACS, people are identified as having a disability based on responses to a series of six questions asking about having difficulties with vision, hearing, ambulation, cognition, self-care, and independent living. These questions are:

  • Are you blind or do you have serious difficulty seeing, even when wearing glasses?

  • Are you deaf or do you have serious difficulty hearing?

  • Do you have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs?

 
  • Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, do you have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions?

  • Do you have difficulty dressing or bathing?

  • Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, do you have difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor's office or shopping?

A response of ‘yes’ to any one of these six questions identifies an individual as having a disability in the ACS. Specific to North Dakota, the state chosen for this report, sentences providing interpretation and context for prevalence statistics are included below. A short glossary of terms is also provided at the end of the report explaining the statistics that are illustrated in each sentence.

Interpretation

The following statements are designed to help understand the 2015 county-level statistics from North Dakota that are presented:

  • For people with and without disabilities: 

    • The range of total people across North Dakota counties, also known as the difference between the largest and smallest counts of people across North Dakota counties, was 160,665.

      • The county with the greatest number of total people was Cass (161,338 people).

      • The county with the least number of total people was Slope (673 people).

    • The average number of total people across all counties was 13,327.

    • The median, also known as the middle-most number, of total people across North Dakota counties was 4,143.

 
  • For people with disabilities: 

    • The range of people with disabilities across North Dakota counties, also known as the difference between the largest and smallest counts of people with disabilities across North Dakota counties, was 15,098.

      • The county with the greatest number of people with disabilities was Cass (15,164 people).

      • The county with the least number of people with disabilities was Billings (66 people).

    • The average number of people with disabilities across all counties was 1,403.

    • The median, also known as the middle-most number, of people with disabilities across North Dakota counties was 490.

  • For people without disabilities: 

    • The range of people without disabilities across North Dakota counties, also known as the difference between the largest and smallest counts of people without disabilities across North Dakota counties, was 145,592.

      • The county with the greatest number of people without disabilities was Cass (146,174 people).

      • The county with the leastnumber of people without disabilities was Slope (582 people).

    • The average number of people without disabilities across all counties was 11,924.

    • The median, also known as the middle-most number, of people without disabilities across North Dakota counties was 3,622.

 

Prevalence of People with and without Disabilities for North Dakota, by County: 2015

County Total Disability No Disability   County Total Disability No Disability
Count % Count % Count % Count %
North Dakota  706,307 74,348 10.5 631,959 89.5 McIntosh        2,647    466 17.6   2,181 82.4
Adams           2,291    293 12.8   1,998 87.2 McKenzie        9,549    860  9.0   8,689 91.0
Barnes         10,904  1,369 12.6   9,535 87.4 McLean          9,261    931 10.1   8,330 89.9
Benson          6,779    605  8.9   6,174 91.1 Mercer          8,521    942 11.1   7,579 88.9
Billings          969     66  6.8     903 93.2 Morton         28,438  3,009 10.6  25,429 89.4
Bottineau       6,465    802 12.4   5,663 87.6 Mountrail       9,155    740  8.1   8,415 91.9
Bowman          3,156    358 11.3   2,798 88.7 Nelson          2,966    369 12.4   2,597 87.6
Burke           2,207    214  9.7   1,993 90.3 Oliver          1,819    207 11.4   1,612 88.6
Burleigh       86,343  8,706 10.1  77,637 89.9 Pembina         7,042    947 13.4   6,095 86.6
Cass          161,338 15,164  9.4 146,174 90.6 Pierce          4,204    447 10.6   3,757 89.4
Cavalier        3,794    439 11.6   3,355 88.4 Ramsey         11,065  1,545 14.0   9,520 86.0
Dickey          5,049    490  9.7   4,559 90.3 Ransom          5,301    763 14.4   4,538 85.6
Divide          2,257    363 16.1   1,894 83.9 Renville        2,481    232  9.4   2,249 90.6
Dunn            4,143    521 12.6   3,622 87.4 Richland       16,147  1,541  9.5  14,606 90.5
Eddy            2,296    263 11.5   2,033 88.5 Rolette        14,374  2,027 14.1  12,347 85.9
Emmons          3,408    535 15.7   2,873 84.3 Sargent         3,837    441 11.5   3,396 88.5
Foster          3,300    339 10.3   2,961 89.7 Sheridan        1,337    195 14.6   1,142 85.4
Golden Valley   1,767    275 15.6   1,492 84.4 Sioux           4,333    436 10.1   3,897 89.9
Grand Forks    67,070  6,764 10.1  60,306 89.9 Slope             673     91 13.5     582 86.5
Grant           2,323    291 12.5   2,032 87.5 Stark          28,174  2,700  9.6  25,474 90.4
Griggs          2,238    285 12.7   1,953 87.3 Steele          1,979    274 13.8   1,705 86.2
Hettinger       2,459    333 13.5   2,126 86.5 Stutsman       20,163  2,856 14.2  17,307 85.8
Kidder          2,430    303 12.5   2,127 87.5 Towner          2,259    211  9.3   2,048 90.7
LaMoure         4,044    490 12.1   3,554 87.9 Traill          7,897    789 10.0   7,108 90.0
Logan           1,870    290 15.5   1,580 84.5 Walsh          10,827  1,862 17.2   8,965 82.8
McHenry         5,738    716 12.5   5,022 87.5 Ward           63,839  6,446 10.1  57,393 89.9
County Total Disability No Disability   County Total Disability No Disability
Count % Count % Count % Count %
Wells           4,119    602 14.6   3,517 85.4                                               
Williams       29,262  2,145  7.3  27,117 92.7                                               
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             
                                                                                             

Count of People with Disabilities for North Dakota, by County: 2015

Percentage of People with Disabilities for North Dakota, by County: 2015

Discussion

There are a number of concepts and factors which complicate the interpretation of the estimates presented in this report. These concerns affect all statistics from population-based surveys. The estimates included in this document should be interpreted the following limitations in mind and generalized with caution. In each point, a link to the U.S. Census Bureau website describing the limitation or concept in greater detail in the ACS has been provided (www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/).

  • Statistics are based on a sample and subject to sample variation (a discussion of this topic can be found here).

  • Statistics based on a sample may not fully represent the total U.S. population (a discussion of this topic can be found here).

  • People responding to the ACS may be different than people not responding (a discussion of this topic can be found here).

  • When people do not respond to all ACS questions their responses are created based on assignment or allocation (a discussion of this topic can be found here).

Additional resources for the ACS:

  • Information on the disability questions can be found here.

  • The ACS design and methodology can be found here.

  • The ACS questionnaire and instructions can be found here.

Definitions

Average—The sum of all of the values in a sample divided by the number of values in the sample.
Median—The middlemost value of a sample that separates the upper half of the values from the lower half of the values.
Prevalence—The proportion of the population with a particular status or condition. Prevalence is usually expressed as a percentage or a number of people per unit of the population.
Population—The total number of inhabitants in a defined geographic area including all races, classes, and groups.
Range—The difference between the largest and smallest values in a sample. In a sample, when the smallest value is subtracted from the largest value the resulting value is called the range.

Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics

Policymakers, program administrators, service providers, researchers, advocates for people with disabilities, and people with disabilities and their families need accessible, valid data/statistics to support their decisions related to policy improvements, program administration, service delivery, protection of civil rights, and major life activities. The StatsRRTC supports decision making through a variety of integrated research and outreach activities by (a) improving knowledge about and access to existing data, (b) generating the knowledge needed to improve future disability data collection, and (c) strengthening connections between the data from and regarding respondents, researchers, and decision makers. In this way, the Stats RRTC supports the improvement of service systems that advance the quality of life for people with disabilities.

Led by the University of New Hampshire, the StatsRRTC is a collaborative effort involving the following partners: American Association of People with Disabilities, Center for Essential Management Services, Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation, Kessler Foundation, Mathematica Policy Research, and Public Health Institute. The StatsRRTC is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research under grant number 90RT502201, from 2013–2018.

Employment Policy and Measurement Rehabilitation Research and Training Center

The EPM-RRTC generates and translates new information about disability employment policy and ways to measure the labor market experiences of people with disabilities. By improving the quality of available information about program interactions, policy options, and employment outcomes, the EPM-RRTC increases evidence-based advocacy and policymaking.

Led by the University of New Hampshire, the EPM-RRTC is a collaborative effort involving the following partners: Association of University Centers on Disability, Hunter College, Kessler Foundation, Mathematica Policy Research, and the University of Chicago. The EPM-RRTC is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research under grant number 90RT503701, from 2015–2020.