Disability Prevalence Report

Acknowledgement

Special thanks to the following individuals who have contributed to the success of this effort: Deb Brucker, Erin Dame, Adam Lavoie, Rachel Coleman, Kate Filanoski, and Karen Volle. 

Funding for this publication is made possible by:

The Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics (StatsRRTC), funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Community Living National Institute on Disability, Independent Living, and Rehabilitation Research (NIDILRR), grant number 90RT5022-02-01; and the Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Employment Policy and Measurement (EPM-RRTC), also funded by NIDILRR, grant number 90RT5037-01-00. The information developed by the StatsRRTC and EPM-RRTC does not necessarily represent the policies of the Department of Health and Human Services, and you should not assume endorsement by the Federal Government (Edgar, 75.620 (b)).

The StatsRRTC and EPM-RRTC are part of the Institute on Disability at the University of New Hampshire. The Institute on Disability/UCED (IOD) was established in 1987 to provide a university-based focus for the improvement of knowledge, policies, and practices related to the lives of people with disabilities and their families and is New Hampshire’s University Center for Excellence in Disability (UCED). Located within the University of New Hampshire, the IOD is a federally designated center authorized by the Developmental Disabilities Act. Through innovative and interdisciplinary research, academic, service, and dissemination initiatives, the IOD builds local, state, and national capacities to respond to the needs of individuals with disabilities and their families.

 

 

 
 
 
 

Institute on Disability / UCED
10 West Edge Drive, Suite 101
Durham, NH 03284
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www.iod.unh.edu

2015 Virginia Report for County-level Data: Prevalence

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on
Disability Statistics and Demographics
A NIDILRR-Funded Center

   NIDILIRR.jpg

 

Introduction

The State Reports for County-Level Data on Prevalence are designed to provide the users of disability statistics with the number of people with disabilities for any given state and county in the United States (U.S.). This report is intended to be an online compliment to Section 1: Population and Prevalence of the Annual Disability Statistics Compendium and Annual Disability Statistics Supplement, providing greater detail within each state. The State Reports for County-Level Data on Prevalence can be used to compare county-level statistics between counties in any given state or states. The following report provides county-level statistics for Virginia.

The proportions of people with disabilities, sometimes called prevalence, presented in the State Reports for County-Level Data is a useful tool for advocates, researchers, and policy-makers to plan and provide services and supports for people with disabilities. In this report, the prevalence of people with disabilities is presented as the number of people with disabilities in a given state and county per total state and county populations, respectively. Counts and percentages are provided in tables and maps.

The data for this report comes from the American Community Survey 5-year data. The American Community Survey (ACS) is a national survey developed by the U.S. Census Bureau to provide information on a number of topics about social, economic, and demographic characteristics of the U.S. population. ACS 5-year data is collected over a longer period of time than 1-year data, providing larger sample sizes and increased reliability for less populated areas and small population subgroups. All of the statistics in this report use the ACS 5-year data which includes data from 2015, the year of the report, and data from the four previous years.

In the ACS, people are identified as having a disability based on responses to a series of six questions asking about having difficulties with vision, hearing, ambulation, cognition, self-care, and independent living. These questions are:

  • Are you blind or do you have serious difficulty seeing, even when wearing glasses?

  • Are you deaf or do you have serious difficulty hearing?

  • Do you have serious difficulty walking or climbing stairs?

 
  • Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, do you have serious difficulty concentrating, remembering, or making decisions?

  • Do you have difficulty dressing or bathing?

  • Because of a physical, mental, or emotional condition, do you have difficulty doing errands alone such as visiting a doctor's office or shopping?

A response of ‘yes’ to any one of these six questions identifies an individual as having a disability in the ACS. Specific to Virginia, the state chosen for this report, sentences providing interpretation and context for prevalence statistics are included below. A short glossary of terms is also provided at the end of the report explaining the statistics that are illustrated in each sentence.

Interpretation

The following statements are designed to help understand the 2015 county-level statistics from Virginia that are presented:

  • For people with and without disabilities: 

    • The range of total people across Virginia counties, also known as the difference between the largest and smallest counts of people across Virginia counties, was 1,113,023.

      • The county with the greatest number of total people was Fairfax (1,115,267 people).

      • The county with the least number of total people was Highland (2,244 people).

    • The average number of total people across all counties was 60,474.

    • The median, also known as the middle-most number, of total people across Virginia counties was 24,508.

 
  • For people with disabilities: 

    • The range of people with disabilities across Virginia counties, also known as the difference between the largest and smallest counts of people with disabilities across Virginia counties, was 73,494.

      • The county with the greatest number of people with disabilities was Fairfax (73,908 people).

      • The county with the least number of people with disabilities was Highland (414 people).

    • The average number of people with disabilities across all counties was 6,747.

    • The median, also known as the middle-most number, of people with disabilities across Virginia counties was 3,696.

  • For people without disabilities: 

    • The range of people without disabilities across Virginia counties, also known as the difference between the largest and smallest counts of people without disabilities across Virginia counties, was 1,039,529.

      • The county with the greatest number of people without disabilities was Fairfax (1,041,359 people).

      • The county with the leastnumber of people without disabilities was Highland (1,830 people).

    • The average number of people without disabilities across all counties was 53,727.

    • The median, also known as the middle-most number, of people without disabilities across Virginia counties was 21,362.

 

Prevalence of People with and without Disabilities for Virginia, by County: 2015

County Total Disability No Disability   County Total Disability No Disability
Count % Count % Count % Count %
Virginia         8,043,013 897,300 11.2 7,145,713 88.8 Chesterfield       325,417  32,659 10.0   292,758 90.0
Accomack            32,709   4,065 12.4    28,644 87.6 Clarke              14,104   1,549 11.0    12,555 89.0
Albemarle          101,532   9,341  9.2    92,191 90.8 Colonial Heights    17,268   2,758 16.0    14,510 84.0
Alexandria         146,228   9,105  6.2   137,123 93.8 Covington            5,556   1,141 20.5     4,415 79.5
Alleghany           15,826   2,976 18.8    12,850 81.2 Craig                5,195   1,077 20.7     4,118 79.3
Amelia              12,678   1,900 15.0    10,778 85.0 Culpeper            46,825   4,879 10.4    41,946 89.6
Amherst             31,970   4,582 14.3    27,388 85.7 Cumberland           9,859   1,696 17.2     8,163 82.8
Appomattox          15,137   2,568 17.0    12,569 83.0 Danville            41,309   8,221 19.9    33,088 80.1
Arlington          220,280  11,832  5.4   208,448 94.6 Dickenson           15,068   3,696 24.5    11,372 75.5
Augusta             70,232   9,821 14.0    60,411 86.0 Dinwiddie           27,685   4,714 17.0    22,971 83.0
Bath                 4,521     661 14.6     3,860 85.4 Emporia              5,457   1,189 21.8     4,268 78.2
Bedford             76,027  10,666 14.0    65,361 86.0 Essex               11,075   1,355 12.2     9,720 87.8
Bland                5,727   1,010 17.6     4,717 82.4 Fairfax             22,898   1,838  8.0    21,060 92.0
Botetourt           32,886   4,575 13.9    28,311 86.1 Fairfax          1,115,267  73,908  6.6 1,041,359 93.4
Bristol             17,367   3,603 20.7    13,764 79.3 Falls Church        13,211     904  6.8    12,307 93.2
Brunswick           15,216   2,743 18.0    12,473 82.0 Fauquier            67,009   7,179 10.7    59,830 89.3
Buchanan            22,446   5,561 24.8    16,885 75.2 Floyd               15,435   2,197 14.2    13,238 85.8
Buckingham          15,040   2,781 18.5    12,259 81.5 Fluvanna            24,710   3,348 13.5    21,362 86.5
Buena Vista          6,590     897 13.6     5,693 86.4 Franklin             8,327     947 11.4     7,380 88.6
Campbell            54,526   8,090 14.8    46,436 85.2 Franklin            55,986   8,503 15.2    47,483 84.8
Caroline            27,198   3,579 13.2    23,619 86.8 Frederick           80,365   9,365 11.7    71,000 88.3
Carroll             29,718   5,311 17.9    24,407 82.1 Fredericksburg      27,148   2,648  9.8    24,500 90.2
Charles City         7,095   1,065 15.0     6,030 85.0 Galax                6,586   1,413 21.5     5,173 78.5
Charlotte           12,175   2,605 21.4     9,570 78.6 Giles               16,774   3,460 20.6    13,314 79.4
Charlottesville     44,706   3,997  8.9    40,709 91.1 Gloucester          36,176   5,099 14.1    31,077 85.9
Chesapeake         218,437  21,046  9.6   197,391 90.4 Goochland           20,409   2,383 11.7    18,026 88.3
County Total Disability No Disability   County Total Disability No Disability
Count % Count % Count % Count %
Grayson             15,297   2,922 19.1    12,375 80.9 Martinsville        13,271   2,788 21.0    10,483 79.0
Greene              18,728   2,516 13.4    16,212 86.6 Mathews              8,761   1,295 14.8     7,466 85.2
Greensville          7,564   1,587 21.0     5,977 79.0 Mecklenburg         30,192   5,737 19.0    24,455 81.0
Halifax             34,794   6,425 18.5    28,369 81.5 Middlesex           10,350   1,709 16.5     8,641 83.5
Hampton            131,770  16,531 12.5   115,239 87.5 Montgomery          95,900   8,778  9.2    87,122 90.8
Hanover            100,598  10,088 10.0    90,510 90.0 Nelson              14,801   2,150 14.5    12,651 85.5
Harrisonburg        50,672   3,783  7.5    46,889 92.5 New Kent            19,020   2,070 10.9    16,950 89.1
Henrico            316,845  32,373 10.2   284,472 89.8 Newport News       172,212  21,676 12.6   150,536 87.4
Henry               51,968   9,667 18.6    42,301 81.4 Norfolk            219,275  27,319 12.5   191,956 87.5
Highland             2,244     414 18.4     1,830 81.6 Northampton         11,886   1,581 13.3    10,305 86.7
Hopewell            21,948   4,236 19.3    17,712 80.7 Northumberland      12,304   1,874 15.2    10,430 84.8
Isle of Wight       35,270   4,263 12.1    31,007 87.9 Norton               3,949     719 18.2     3,230 81.8
James City          69,082   7,469 10.8    61,613 89.2 Nottoway            14,489   2,690 18.6    11,799 81.4
King George         24,508   2,662 10.9    21,846 89.1 Orange              34,073   4,943 14.5    29,130 85.5
King William        16,038   1,757 11.0    14,281 89.0 Page                23,648   4,309 18.2    19,339 81.8
King and Queen       7,106     813 11.4     6,293 88.6 Patrick             18,037   3,432 19.0    14,605 81.0
Lancaster           11,043   1,717 15.5     9,326 84.5 Petersburg          31,239   6,361 20.4    24,878 79.6
Lee                 23,781   6,133 25.8    17,648 74.2 Pittsylvania        61,986  10,981 17.7    51,005 82.3
Lexington            5,643     639 11.3     5,004 88.7 Poquoson            11,937   1,209 10.1    10,728 89.9
Loudoun            349,284  18,471  5.3   330,813 94.7 Portsmouth          92,298  12,507 13.6    79,791 86.4
Louisa              33,888   4,953 14.6    28,935 85.4 Powhatan            25,621   2,426  9.5    23,195 90.5
Lunenburg           11,191   2,187 19.5     9,004 80.5 Prince Edward       22,299   2,924 13.1    19,375 86.9
Lynchburg           76,635   9,588 12.5    67,047 87.5 Prince George       32,524   4,527 13.9    27,997 86.1
Madison             12,971   1,651 12.7    11,320 87.3 Prince William     429,049  29,753  6.9   399,296 93.1
Manassas            40,689   3,235  8.0    37,454 92.0 Pulaski             33,589   5,610 16.7    27,979 83.3
Manassas Park       15,539   1,293  8.3    14,246 91.7 Radford             16,886   2,084 12.3    14,802 87.7
County Total Disability No Disability   County Total Disability No Disability
Count % Count % Count % Count %
Rappahannock         7,413     891 12.0     6,522 88.0 Winchester          26,906   3,566 13.3    23,340 86.7
Richmond             7,104   1,063 15.0     6,041 85.0 Wise                38,320   9,553 24.9    28,767 75.1
Richmond           211,150  32,599 15.4   178,551 84.6 Wythe               28,917   5,449 18.8    23,468 81.2
Roanoke             92,069  10,531 11.4    81,538 88.6 York                63,478   6,390 10.1    57,088 89.9
Roanoke             97,442  17,137 17.6    80,305 82.4                                                       
Rockbridge          22,265   3,671 16.5    18,594 83.5                                                       
Rockingham          77,411  10,000 12.9    67,411 87.1                                                       
Russell             28,019   6,614 23.6    21,405 76.4                                                       
Salem               24,495   3,339 13.6    21,156 86.4                                                       
Scott               21,949   5,129 23.4    16,820 76.6                                                       
Shenandoah          42,272   5,896 13.9    36,376 86.1                                                       
Smyth               31,198   5,953 19.1    25,245 80.9                                                       
Southampton         16,872   2,688 15.9    14,184 84.1                                                       
Spotsylvania       126,780  14,185 11.2   112,595 88.8                                                       
Stafford           131,108  10,427  8.0   120,681 92.0                                                       
Staunton            23,645   4,170 17.6    19,475 82.4                                                       
Suffolk             83,818   9,528 11.4    74,290 88.6                                                       
Surry                6,823   1,040 15.2     5,783 84.8                                                       
Sussex               6,626   1,112 16.8     5,514 83.2                                                       
Tazewell            42,700  10,273 24.1    32,427 75.9                                                       
Virginia Beach     422,939  42,671 10.1   380,268 89.9                                                       
Warren              38,112   4,887 12.8    33,225 87.2                                                       
Washington          54,120   9,878 18.3    44,242 81.7                                                       
Waynesboro          21,009   3,023 14.4    17,986 85.6                                                       
Westmoreland        17,403   2,967 17.0    14,436 83.0                                                       
Williamsburg        14,572   1,339  9.2    13,233 90.8                                                       

Count of People with Disabilities for Virginia, by County: 2015

Percentage of People with Disabilities for Virginia, by County: 2015

Discussion

There are a number of concepts and factors which complicate the interpretation of the estimates presented in this report. These concerns affect all statistics from population-based surveys. The estimates included in this document should be interpreted the following limitations in mind and generalized with caution. In each point, a link to the U.S. Census Bureau website describing the limitation or concept in greater detail in the ACS has been provided (www.census.gov/programs-surveys/acs/).

  • Statistics are based on a sample and subject to sample variation (a discussion of this topic can be found here).

  • Statistics based on a sample may not fully represent the total U.S. population (a discussion of this topic can be found here).

  • People responding to the ACS may be different than people not responding (a discussion of this topic can be found here).

  • When people do not respond to all ACS questions their responses are created based on assignment or allocation (a discussion of this topic can be found here).

Additional resources for the ACS:

  • Information on the disability questions can be found here.

  • The ACS design and methodology can be found here.

  • The ACS questionnaire and instructions can be found here.

Definitions

Average—The sum of all of the values in a sample divided by the number of values in the sample.
Median—The middlemost value of a sample that separates the upper half of the values from the lower half of the values.
Prevalence—The proportion of the population with a particular status or condition. Prevalence is usually expressed as a percentage or a number of people per unit of the population.
Population—The total number of inhabitants in a defined geographic area including all races, classes, and groups.
Range—The difference between the largest and smallest values in a sample. In a sample, when the smallest value is subtracted from the largest value the resulting value is called the range.

Rehabilitation Research and Training Center on Disability Statistics and Demographics

Policymakers, program administrators, service providers, researchers, advocates for people with disabilities, and people with disabilities and their families need accessible, valid data/statistics to support their decisions related to policy improvements, program administration, service delivery, protection of civil rights, and major life activities. The StatsRRTC supports decision making through a variety of integrated research and outreach activities by (a) improving knowledge about and access to existing data, (b) generating the knowledge needed to improve future disability data collection, and (c) strengthening connections between the data from and regarding respondents, researchers, and decision makers. In this way, the Stats RRTC supports the improvement of service systems that advance the quality of life for people with disabilities.

Led by the University of New Hampshire, the StatsRRTC is a collaborative effort involving the following partners: American Association of People with Disabilities, Center for Essential Management Services, Council of State Administrators of Vocational Rehabilitation, Kessler Foundation, Mathematica Policy Research, and Public Health Institute. The StatsRRTC is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research under grant number 90RT502201, from 2013–2018.

Employment Policy and Measurement Rehabilitation Research and Training Center

The EPM-RRTC generates and translates new information about disability employment policy and ways to measure the labor market experiences of people with disabilities. By improving the quality of available information about program interactions, policy options, and employment outcomes, the EPM-RRTC increases evidence-based advocacy and policymaking.

Led by the University of New Hampshire, the EPM-RRTC is a collaborative effort involving the following partners: Association of University Centers on Disability, Hunter College, Kessler Foundation, Mathematica Policy Research, and the University of Chicago. The EPM-RRTC is funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Community Living, National Institute on Disability, Independent Living and Rehabilitation Research under grant number 90RT503701, from 2015–2020.